isolation

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Synonym Discussion of isolation

solitudeisolationseclusion mean the state of one who is alone. solitude may imply a condition of being apart from all human beings or of being cut off by wish or circumstances from one’s usual associates.

    • a few quiet hours of solitude

isolation stresses detachment from others often involuntarily.

    • the isolation of the village in winter

seclusion suggests a shutting away or keeping apart from others often connoting deliberate withdrawal from the world or retirement to a quiet life.

    • lived in pastoral seclusion

 

ISOLATION this is such a sad and lonely word, just pushing the sounds across your tongue sounds just……….blah.

ISOLATION is what the prison system uses to further punish those who misbehave while behind bars.  It is meant to break people so they never want to do another bad thing.

Many individuals with chronic illness are living isolated lives.  Isolation leads to even more unwanted side effects or exaggeration of current symptoms such as depression, anxiety, worry, loneliness and pain.

No one wants to feel lonely and too many people are scared to admit they feel alone because, simply put, in today’s world, it equals loser, or worse yet, unlovable.  Obviously this is not true, but those feelings are there none-the-less.

Being chronically ill, we have already lost so much……..previous abilities to do what we loved, stamina, a good night sleep, to interact with our surrounding in a immediate and prompt way……adding loneliness into the mix is a huge slap in the face, fuel to the fire.

This world (at least here in the US) is fixated on the health, youth, independence, wealth, and “beauty” at all costs and people do not take time to slow down and go and visit a friend who is ill, let alone even know who their neighbors are…………so what can we do about this?

…….PLEASE, if you know someone in your neck of the woods who is alone, sick, lonely, can’t get out and interact with the world on a regular basis, please take 1 hour out of  the next 30 days and do something about it.  This simple act of kindness, multiplied by many, sends love where it needs to be, with those who can use it the most.  If you are personally unable to get out of your home, send a card or a letter to someone else who is in a similar situation.  Emails are nice and texts can be great too, but taking the time to send a personal note shows you took an extra step out of your day and thought of them in a very real way.  Now please go……………

Image result for quotes of gandhi to be the change you want to see in the world

 

45 thoughts on “isolation

  1. Thanks for sharing… there are many in this world who suffer because of narrow minded social idologies, hopefully one day the world will be as better place, especially with help like yours… 🙂

    “The good deed you do today may benefit you or someone you love at the least expected time . If you never see the deed again at least you will have made the world a better place – “

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful post, Wendi. Such a good idea and you raise many important points. I also think that for people who are lonely themselves, reaching out to another may be the hardest but the most important thing they can do. There is a kind of universal power that happens when you reach out to help another person, in giving them the same thing you need, it can help fill that void. If that makes any sense. Thanks for this, I hope you’re having a wonderful day! 💕

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Wendi,

    Your blog post on this subject is especially poignant and timely. Each of the terms you describe can be applied in a number of circumstances, not all of which are necessarily negative.

    I once wrote about my appreciation for the opportunity to experience solitude, since it forced me to contemplate the importance of a particular memory, which might otherwise have escaped notice:

    “I remember hearing the seagulls. Perhaps the natural spring was in a mountain near a beach. There was no other sound aside from the water, the birds, and the music in my soul. With eyes closed, the memory of the experience was fully engaged. It was a moment of repose, of silence, of solitude, forcing me to contemplate a memory of a feeling. I cannot completely or precisely replicate them. They only rise up within me in my solitude. In spite of the difference in time and possibilities, the unknown, the uncertain, the vague, all of it comes together in a moment of solitude. “

    Some years ago, I wrote a poem entitled, “Uncharted Hearts,” recalling a period of my life in which I was living my daily life alone as a young man, remembering a dream that spoke to the possibility of hope:

    “During that time I dreamt that I was walking in solitude,’…amongst the towering pillars of heaven,’ in the lush forests of memory. I came upon another gentle soul, ‘…in the golden meadow at dawn,’ and embraced them in a ‘…blissful dance,’ set to the ‘…music of the ages.”

    Our appreciation of solitude, seclusion, and isolation depend a great deal on what we bring to those circumstances, but also on whether or not they are imposed upon us against our will. The challenge for individuals with chronic illness, as you so succinctly expressed it, is that their “…isolation leads to even more unwanted side effects or exaggeration of current symptoms such as depression, anxiety, worry, loneliness and pain.” Everyone needs to feel that they are a part of the world-at-large in some capacity, and your plea to extend ourselves to others in isolation, especially if it is as a result of chronic illness, addresses one of the most urgent issues of our time.

    Solitude and seclusion can be a choice, but overcoming the feeling of isolation and loneliness, which may result, requires a degree of strength and fortitude that chronic illness can impair greatly. I think it would be great if you would apply your keen sense of what it is like to experience this isolation, and elaborate further on this subject, offering your recommendations to other readers on how to cope with this important issue.

    Regards….John H.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Oh my goodness John, I so love to read your posts and especially love to read your responses! You explained everything so very well and I really appreciate your wisdom and insight. You are absolutely correct, isolation depends on whether or not it is self-imposed or thrown upon you by an unwanted outside force. My heart bleeds for people who are too ill to reach out to others…….or are too afraid to do so as they have been rejected by those who they thought loved them……I started working on a post on how isolation in the chronic illness population could be changed but I just deleted the whole thing as I was unable to put the feelings I really need to express on paper. I know you are a kind soul and reach out to others……..and when you extend your love to people who have to little to give back, the angels sing and the world gives a happy sigh………
      Thank you, again John for taking the time to leave your beautiful words on my post!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m crying now, because this is exactly where I’m at right now. Just walking to the mailbox kicked my ass, I can’t imagine how bad work is going to suck tomorrow, and my husband is out of town so I have nobody to cry too.😙😙😙

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Wendi, forget your fears that you are unable to write well: you write splendidly, with passion and clarity, and look how many hearts you touch. I strongly believe that blogging is a powerful tool for reaching out and giving and receiving support when we need it, don’t you? Your blog shows that process in action. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Rachel………..thank you so very much for your kind and encouraging words, they are deeply appreciated! Yes, I absolutely agree that blogging is a very powerful tool……I have been blessed beyond measure to “get to know” so many wonderfully talented people just like yourself.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. This is absolutely spot on. With mom and her cancer, I am grateful when people call or visit or write. But, even for me. I’m a person with Diabetes and MS and am so tired. When I get a random note from someone, it makes my day!!!
    This is why I blog. I share and find so many people who understand and help light my path!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so very much Kris. I am so sorry you are having to go through such a mess, I can’t imagine how difficult life must be for you………and yes! there are many people out here who understand what you are going through to the best of their ability.

      Liked by 1 person

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